Tuesday, December 29, 2015

LINE HAND SKILL


Training the Partner Hand for Better Casting
By Dave Cleaves - North Potomac, Maryland, USA

The line hand is a sometimes overlooked stepchild in the world of fly fishing. But the reality is, the line hand is both a necessary and important part of the cast, a component that partners with the rod hand in an intricate and dynamic dance which influences every aspect of our connection with the fish – casting, presentation,
line management, striking, and playing the fish. (Line hand in this context, refers to the hand, arm, and shoulder–not just the hand itself.) Guidance and coordinated practice utilizing the line is needed and necessary if a fly fisher wants to vastly improve his or her levels of performance. 

Blogger note;  This is just the first paragraph of an article in the Loop Magazine.  Click the link to continue reading.  CASTING

Sunday, December 27, 2015

FLY FISHING CLASS



Fly Fishing 101 Class Two of Five
 A great group of men and women enjoyed class number 2 of 5, at the Veterans Affairs Office in White River Junction, VT which services veterans from New Hampshire and Vermont.
The Fly Fishing 101 class is a part of a 5 month program, donated to the Project Healing Waters by the International Federation of Fly Fisher North Eastern Council. The 5 month program is developed and instructed by Burr Tupper and Ron Sowa.
The program consists of the following, What do fish eat, Matching the hatch , Fly Tying Beginner and Intermediate, Fly Fishing 101 (Covers rods, reels, lines, leaders and knots) Rod assembly, Casting and Tips and Techniques Reading the water, Fishing with Dry Flies, Streamers and Nymphs, Where to fish in NH, VT and ME ending with a Field trip and putting it all together on the river with some catching their first trout.
Today the group was shown how a fly rod is constructed from start to finish. Also the types of rods (weights - rod actions and lengths).
 The second half of the class they were shown the workings of a fly reel and the types of drag systems that fly reels have and why you need them.
A big Thank You goes out to all the men and women who have served in our armed services.



Thursday, December 10, 2015

WHY USE THE BLOG?

Advantages of a blog

Use the articles and links to connect with some great fly fishing, casting, and tying information.

Search the blog by using the labels (key words).

The blog becomes interactive by clicking on the comments.  Read the comments and then you might want to make your own comment.  Maybe you can offer an additional insight.

The blog is less formal than the website and is not tied to a schedule like a newsletter.  Any article can be easily and quickly modified to make a correction or add additional information.

Use the FOLLOW BY EMAIL feature and you will be notified with every new posting. 


The blog can help promote your Council or Club events.  It is free advertising and covers planet earth.  Think large!

Wednesday, December 9, 2015

MEL KRIEGER

Bruce Morrison has written an story about Mel Krieger that is in the fall edition of the Loop.  Even if you never were lucky enough meet Mel, you will find it interesting.  Click this link for the complete article.  http://www.fedflyfishers.org/Portals/0/Documents/Casting/The%20Loop/Documents/2015.Fall.Loop.MelKrieger.pdf


Mel Krieger is known to fly fishers around the world. During his
35 years as a casting instructor Mel taught in Austria, Germany, England, Scandinavia, Switzerland, England, Australia, New Zealand, South America, the United States, Canada, and Asia. Mel was the head of the western division of the Fenwick Fly Casting Schools. When Fenwick decided to close the schools Mel started his own school, The Mel Krieger International School of Fly Fishing.




Lee Wulff, Joan Wulff, Mel Krieger

ery mile you travel” Mel Krieger (1993, IFFF publication)

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

OPPOSITION TO SB 1140 AND SJR 22

 Important News:  November 2, 2015 IFFF joined other sportsmen's groups to oppose SB 1140 and SJR 22 which have the potential to negatively affect protections provided by the Clean Water Act .  Read these two letters. 

AMERICAN FISHERIES SOCIETY AMERICAN FLY FISHING TRADE ASSOCIATION ∙ BACKCOUNTRY HUNTERS AND ANGLERS ∙ INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF FLY FISHERS ∙ IZAAK WALTON LEAGUE OF AMERICA ∙ NATIONAL WILDLIFE FEDERATION ∙ THEODORE ROOSEVELT CONSERVATION PARTNERSHIP ∙ TROUT UNLIMITED

November 2, 2015
Re: Hunters and Anglers Strongly Oppose S.1140, Legislation Blocking the Clean Water Rule
Dear Senator:
The undersigned sportsmen organizations strongly oppose S.1140, the “Federal Water Quality Protection Act.S.1140 would derail a final rule which clarifies the jurisdiction of the Clean Water Act. Produced by EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers (the Agencies), the Clean Water Rule restores longstanding protections for millions of wetlands and headwater streams. These waters contribute to the drinking water of 1 in 3 Americans, protect communities from flooding, and provide essential fish and wildlife habitat that supports a robust outdoor recreation economy.
The Clean Water Rule is a major step forward in clarifying protections for many streams and wetlands that have been at increased risk of pollution or destruction due to regulatory confusion during the last 15 years. These at-risk streams and wetlands are home to countless fish and wildlife species, and America's hunters and anglers rely on them for access to quality days in the field. A recent poll found that 83 percent of sportsmen and women think the Clean Water Act should apply to smaller streams and wetlands, as the new rule directs. The sport fishing industry accounts for 828,000 jobs, nearly $50 billion annually in retail sales, and an economic impact of about $115 billion every year that relies on access to clean water. The Clean Water Rule will translate directly to an improved bottom line for America’s outdoor industry.
We have three primary objections to S.1140. First, S.1140 will lock in a state of jurisdictional confusion for the foreseeable future, meaning that valuable fish and waterfowl habitat will remain at risk indefinitely. The bill prohibits the agencies from clarifying the Clean Water Act until they have met several specified criteria. (The bill directs the agencies to “use best efforts” to satisfy these criteria by December 31, 2016, which is an unrealistic deadline.) After nearly 15 years of Clean Water Act confusion, such an extended delay is unacceptable to the millions of hunters and anglers eager to have their local waters fully protected again.
Second, S.1140’s consultation requirements are unnecessary and duplicative. The Agencies engaged in a thorough multi-year rulemaking process that included over 400 stakeholder
meetings and an extended public comment period that produced over one million comments. Nearly 900,000 members of the public commented in support of the Clean Water Rule. In addition, the Clean Water Rule is informed by a thorough and extensive review of the peer- reviewed literature of wetlands and hydrologic sciences demonstrating the important chemical, physical, and biological connections between water bodies. The bill requires the Agencies to solicit input from stakeholders they have already consulted, consider factors they have already considered, and then propose the rule anew. In reality, the legal issues surrounding Clean Water Act jurisdiction have been hashed out, the science has been analyzed, peer-reviewed, and compiled, and the public and key stakeholders have weighed in. Simply put, the Agencies have all the information they needed to make an informed decision. There is nothing to gain by sending the agencies back to square one.
Third, S.1140 would eliminate federal protections for waters long covered by the Clean Water Act. The bill makes it more difficult to protect smaller headwater streams, disregards wildlife connections in jurisdictional determinations, and eliminates protections for “isolated” waters. Many of these types of waters are prime hunting and fishing grounds, and in the case of what the bill calls “isolated” waters, are also the primary breeding grounds for the vast majority of waterfowl in North America.
We commend the Agencies for finalizing the Clean Water Rule. This rule is the best chance in a generation to clarify Clean Water Act protections while preserving and, in some cases, enhancing longstanding Clean Water Act exemptions for farmers, ranchers, and foresters that encourage wise stewardship of land and water resources.
Opponents claiming the rule goes too far and protects water too much have filed a barrage of nearly identical legal challenges in numerous district and appellate courts across the country.
On October 9
th, the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals issued a temporary stay of the Clean Water Rule nationwide. The Clean Water Rule and those who oppose it will have their day in court. Meanwhile, we want Congress to know that despite these legal challenges, conservationists across the nation are steadfast in our support for the Clean Water Rule. We are confident, when the dust settles in the courts, that the Clean Water Rule will withstand challenges saying it protects our water too much.
The Clean Water Act has always been about restoring and maintaining the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation’s waters. It is bedrock support for America’s more than 40 million hunters and anglers, and for the 117 million Americans whose drinking water depends on healthy headwater streams. Protect America’s clean waters. Oppose S.1140 and any other legislative action against the rule that may follow this fall.
Thank you for considering our views. Sincerely,
American Fisheries Society
American Fly Fishing Trade Association Backcountry Hunters and Anglers International Federation of Fly Fishers
Izaak Walton League of America
National Wildlife Federation
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Trout Unlimited


AMERICAN FLY FISHING TRADE ASSOCIATION ∙ BACKCOUNTRY HUNTERS AND ANGLERS ∙ INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF FLY FISHERS ∙ IZAAK WALTON LEAGUE OF AMERICA ∙ NATIONAL WILDLIFE FEDERATION ∙ THEODORE ROOSEVELT CONSERVATION PARTNERSHIP ∙ TROUT UNLIMITED

November 2, 2015
Re: Hunters and Anglers Strongly Oppose S.J.Res.22 Invalidating the Final Clean Water Rule
Dear Senator:
The undersigned sportsmen organizations strongly oppose Senate Joint Resolution 22 invalidating the final Clean Water Rule, which revises the definition of “waters of the United Statesin a manner that is both legally and scientifically sound.
This joint resolution is an extraordinary and radical action to overturn a fundamental, once-in-a- generation final rule that is critical to the effective implementation of the 1972 Clean Water Act, and that was adopted following an exhaustive public rulemaking process. This joint resolution would overturn this rule that finally resolves longstanding confusion and debate, promotes clarity and efficiency for regulatory programs promoting river health, and preserves longstanding protections for farmers, ranchers, and foresters.
By using the Congressional Review Act, this joint resolution not only wipes out the final Clean Water Rule but also prohibits any substantially similar rule in the future. It locks in the current state of jurisdictional confusion and offers no constructive path forward for regulatory clarity or clean water. America’s hunters and anglers cannot afford to have Congress undermine effective Clean Water Act safeguards, leaving communities and valuable fish and wildlife habitat at risk indefinitely.
This joint resolution dismisses out of hand the voices of the millions of Americans, including businesses that depend on clean water, who support the new rule and are eager to reap its benefits. The agencies engaged in a very transparent and thorough multi-year rulemaking process that included over 400 stakeholder meetings and an extended public comment period that produced over one million comments. Nearly 900,000 members of the public commented in support of the Clean Water Rule. A recent poll found that 83 percent of sportsmen and women think the Clean Water Act should apply to smaller streams and wetlands, as the new rule directs.

The Clean Water Rule clearly restores longstanding protections for millions of wetlands and headwater streams that contribute to the drinking water of 1 in 3 Americans, protect communities from flooding, and provide essential fish and wildlife habitat that supports a robust outdoor recreation economy. The sport fishing industry alone accounts for 828,000 jobs, nearly $50 billion annually in retail sales, and an economic impact of about $115 billion every year that relies on access to clean water. The Clean Water Rule will translate directly to an improved bottom line for America’s outdoor industry.
Opponents claiming the rule goes too far and protects water too much have filed a barrage of nearly identical legal challenges in numerous district and appellate courts across the country. On October 9th, the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals temporarily stayed the Clean Water Rule nationwide. The Clean Water Rule and those who oppose it will have their day in court.
Meanwhile, we want Congress to know that despite these legal challenges, conservationists across the nation are steadfast in our support for the Clean Water Rule. After nearly 15 years of Clean Water Act confusion, further delay is unacceptable to the millions of hunters and anglers eager to have their local waters fully protected again. We are confident, when the dust settles in the courts, that the Clean Water Rule will withstand challenges saying it protects our water too much.
The Clean Water Act has always been about restoring and maintaining the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation’s waters. It is bedrock support for America’s more than 40 million hunters and anglers and for the 117 million Americans whose drinking water depends on healthy headwater streams. We thank all of the members of Congress who stand with America’s sportsmen and women to block attempts to derail the rule, and ask you to reject S.J.Res.22 and any other legislative action against the rule that may follow this fall.
For more information, please contact:
Jimmy Hague, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, jhague@trcp.org Jan Goldman-Carter, National Wildlife Federation, goldmancarterj@nwf.org Steve Moyer, Trout Unlimited, smoyer@tu.org
Scott Kovarovics, Izaak Walton League of America, skovarovics@iwla.org Ben Bulis, American Fly Fishing Trade Association, ben@affta.org

John Gale, Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, gale@backcountryhunters.org Rhonda Sellers, International Federation of Fly Fishers, Rhonda@fedflyfishers.org 

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Breakfast With Lee Clark

It was Thursday, my first day of the IFFF Fair in Bend, Oregon.  There was a busy rush for everyone to eat breakfast and get over to the hall to start the days activities.  When I hit the breakfast buffet it was as if everyone of us from the IFFF fair had converged at almost the same time and overwhelmed this breakfast and the staff that was trying to keep up with the demand for the food.  I went through the offerings and found what I needed to begin breakfast and was lucky enough to find a table that had just been vacated.  After about two bites I noticed a couple looking about for a table and being by myself I invited them to join me.  After all the entire room was filled with fly fishing people so we surely had something in common.

It turned out to be Lee Clark and Betty, his wife.  Now I had a chance to learn something.  Lee was generous with his story of how the Clark’s Stonefly evolved and went on to become a standard.  He explained that once he developed a fly that would float well and also catch fish he wanted to share the joy.  He tied a lot of new Clark’s Stoneflys and then gave them away to his fellow anglers when he was out on the river.  The fly caught fish and a following of anglers and today it is tied by many and has evolved into many variations.

Lee stressed that for the under wing one needs to use polypropylene such as macramé yarn so as to float properly.  He also said that Anton is not a good substitute because of the flotation issue.  Lee has also morphed his own fly by adding a tail to imitate eggs from a female and he calls it the “Clark’s Lady Stone”.  Just add a dyed red Golden Pheasant Tippet feather at the tail.  Lee said he prefers the Daiichi #1280 which is 2x long and 1x fine wire in a size 10.  He feels that it has a better catch rate than the size 8.  He favors deer hair over elk, uses orange thread, and clips the bottom of the hackle.  He mentioned that John Kreft had put his Clark’s Lady Stone on his website along with the step by step tying instructions.  I contacted John Kreft and he gave me permission to use his photos.  Thank you John.  To see it go to johnkreft.com, then go to fly patterns, then to stoneflies and it should be in the middle of the top row.

If you see Lee out on the Metolius or Deschutes River, just give him a thumbs up.
It was a pleasure to bring this story to you.   Tom Collett



Breakfast with Lee Clark


Clark's Lady Stone
Photo by John Kreft, River Keeper Flies, used with permission


This promotional button is a throwback to the early days before it became as popular as it is today.  

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Thomas Gadacz, President, IFFF Florida Council

  • President's Report
    International Federation of Fly Fishers (IFFF) and Bend, Oregon 2015

    The IFFF had its 50th Anniversary and Fair in Bend, Oregon this year from August 13-15. There were many highlights including Joan Wulff, icon of fly fishing and casting as well as some of the past presidents and founding members. President Phil Greenlee celebrated the event with the Frank and Jeanne Moore Award. This award honored Frank for all his contributions to fly fishing and community service. Nathaniel Reed, an avid fly fisher, was the recipient and had a distinguished career in the Department of Interior where he instituted many good practices including the Clean Water Act. The event was hosted by the Oregon Council President, Sherry Steele and the members of the Council. Most of the meetings were at the Riverhouse Convention Center. There were over 80 workshops and program and over 100 fly tiers. Programs included fly fishing, casting, tying, youth and women's programs.

    The Awards banquet honored many contributors including Florida members Leslie Holmes, the Mel Krieger Casting Award, Tom Logan, IFF Conservation Award, Ron Winn, Federator Award, and Ken Hofmeister, the IFFF FL Council Award. See below for details of these awards.

    It was a great opportunity to observe and talk to many great fly tiers as well as getting some casting instructions from many of the best. The vendors represented many of the major manufactures of equipment and supplies, outings, lodges, boats, foreign trips, and related activities. Wednesday evening was the Awards Banquet, Thursday social at the Lea Schwab Amphitheater, Friday evening the auction and dinner, and Saturday evening the BBQ.

    The Fair is a great opportunity to see old friends and make some new ones. In addition to attending some of the sessions, I volunteered in the Youth Program and also did some fishing in the middle Deschutes and Tumulo Creek.

    Prior to the meeting Nick, my son and I did some serious fishing in the Lower Deschutes and East Lake. Nick had the catch of the day with a 20+ inch rainbow (a.k.a. steelhead). We also caught some nice browns and a white fish. Steve Erickson from Jeff Perin's The Fly Fisher's Place was an excellent guide. We fished the Deschutes from Warm Spring to Trout Creek.

    Sherry Steele, Oregon Council President hosted the Council Presidents Committee retreat on Saturday and Sunday so we had a great social time and some fishing. We fished the Metolius River in several spots. It is a spectacular river with great water which maintains a constant temperature of 48 degrees. It was probably one of the most beautiful rivers with the blue colored gorge at Wizard Falls. Tom Gadacz:President, IFFF Florida Council
    l

IFFF Conservation Grants at Work


With support from IFFF-Eastern Waters Council, Patagonia World Trout Initiative and many other funding partners, Friends of the Upper Delaware River (FUDR) has successfully completed 8 of the 11 treatments at Sands Creek. This work includes shoreline stabilization, floodplain re-connection, and the installation of trout habitat structures. all of the treatments will help improve water quality, create new trout habitat, mitigate flooding, and reduce sediment transport. 
Click to watch a video about their progress>>

Monday, September 7, 2015

Like Drinking from a Fire Hose


Like Drinking from a Fire Hose

The sights, sounds, and sensations are coming at you fast and furious.  It is the 50th Anniversary IFFF Fair in Bend, Oregon.  Everyone had their own personal experiences but here are some of my own personal observations.

I was privileged to meet and speak to the Council Presidents at their Wednesday morning meeting.  Russell Husted, President of the Texas Council presented Facebook and their success in Texas.  It was a really good presentation.  I talked about the IFFF blog and Instagram.  There were some really good questions that indicated a lot of interest.  Everyone understands what it means when you look around the room and see only gray hair.  It means that we need to connect with younger people in way that is compatible and meaningful to them.  Let’s step out of our comfort zone.

I took the time to go to a local tackle shop, just a few miles down the road, in Redmond, Oregon.  They have an awesome gimmick, actually more than a gimmick.  They have beer on tap, and yes it is a serious fly shop and they have a variety of some very nice micro brews.  While there I met one of the younger employees and we discussed using social media with younger fly anglers.  He informed me that they have a local customer that uses Instagram and that he has 12.7k followers.  It is hard to believe but it is real and now I am now one of the followers.  I was also able to connect with several other Instagramers while in Bend.

The fly tying chair, Dave Roberts made sure there were lots of great fly tiers.  The 2015 Oregon Tiers of the Year, Dave and Cathy Hamilton were there and doing a great job as always.  Seveinn Thor from Iceland was there.  I couldn’t understand very much of what he said but he did have pictures of some very nice fish and plastic bags full of interesting tube flies.  One booth barely contained the three guys from Japan.  They had lots of very innovative products and ideas.  Kenji, the one at the vice couldn’t speak English worth a darn but he knew all the materials and words for a fly tier.

On the subject of younger folks, I found a certified casting instructor that was 18 years old and he had plans for more certifications.  I found another young man at age 20 who was studying to be a fish biologist.  Congratulations to both.

Wednesday night was the Awards Dinner.  Right away I noticed that Frank and Jeanne Moore as well as Joan Wulff were there.  A short time later they found each other and it was a special moment to see Frank and Joan engaged in the conversation of old friends.  It was very special for sure.  Later at the microphone, Joan made some very funny comments about the sport of fly fishing.  Many awards were presented and then came the highlight of the evening.  A film was shown featuring Frank Moore while fly fishing and it also highlighted Frank and Jeanne as owners of the Steamboat Inn.  The film also documented the pioneering work they did to stop the massive destruction that used to be normal logging practices.  This was the lead up to the announcement of the new Frank and Jeanne Moore Award.  This new award went to The Honorable Nathaniel P. Reed for his role in passing ground breaking legislation during the Carter Presidency.  It was very inspiring to hear the story of how it came about.

Can you see and do everything at the IFFF Fair.  No way, it is like drinking from a fire hose.   Tom Collett