Monday, January 25, 2016

Klamath River, A New Old Story

The story of the dam removal on the Klamath River is a big story that has the potential to be a huge story across the entire globe.  Like many rivers throughout the world it involves the lively hoods of people along with the varied interests of many other river stakeholders.  Many years have passed while trying to negotiate agreements to address the many needs and interests.  There is a virtual alphabet soup of agencies of the Federal Government, Oregon State, California State, and several local Counties, involved.   We also have Birkshire Hathaway, miners, farmers, ranchers, five tribes, fishers, hunters, birders, rafters, conservationists, and ecologists, all making claims to use of the river.  Unfortunately politics of the self-serving variety is trying to derail the hard won compromise.

So far the democratic political system we all cherish has failed to solve the problems and put an end to the conflict.  There must be a better way. 

A relatively new film is working its way into the conscience of our society.  It is titled “A River Between Us”.  It is the work of Jason Atkinson.  Jason was an Oregon State Senator for 14 years and currently serves on Oregon ODFW Commission.  Jason also happens to be a Republican with a passion for conservation.  After many years of trying to get a political consensus on the dam and water use conflict, he has now changed tactics.  The new path is to change the culture and the culture will change the politics.  Writing books, making films, electronic media, and social media are very powerful tools to tell the story that will change the culture.  Many personal appearances so he can tell the back-story is also part of mix.  The message is to heal the people and then we will all heal the river.  Jason also makes use of the part of the bible called the beatitudes, “blessed are the peacemakers”, is just one of them.


You need to see the film, “A River Between Us”.  If you can’t find it in a theatre there are other ways to see it.  Go to the website ariverbetweenus.com.  There you can purchase a DVD or stream it to your computer or television.  You can also find it on iTunes, Amazon and Netflix.
Portland Business Journal – August 18, 2015

Portland Business Journal – August 18, 2015
How Jason Atkinson separates politics from the Klamath’s ‘water wars’
In our weekly PBJ edition (which hit streets Friday), we talked to former Oregon State Senator Jason Atkinson about his latest project, a documentary on the Klamath Basin water wars.
Atkinson produced the project with filmmaker Jeff Martin. He calls it a “cinematic call to action” on the myriad issues surrounding dams along the Klamath River. – Read the entire story here.


on Atkinson separates politics Oregon State Senator Jason Atkinson about his latest project, a 

Atkinson produced the project with filmmaker Jeff Martin. He calls it a “cinematic call to action” on the myriad issues surrounding dams along the Klamath River. – Read the entire story here.
Portland Business Journal – August 18, 2015

How Jason Atkinson separates politics from the Klamath’s ‘water wars’

In our weekly PBJ edition (which hit streets Friday), we talked to former Oregon State Senator Jason Atkinson about his latest project, a documentary on the Klamath Basin water wars.
Atkinson produced the project with filmmaker Jeff Martin. He calls it a “cinematic call to action” on the myriad issues surrounding dams along the Klamath River. – Read the entire story here.

Friday, January 22, 2016

Red Tide – Where to fish?

This comes to us from Tom Gadacz in Florida.

Yes, the red tide has rolled into the St. Pete beaches with dead fish behind Dolphin Village.  So where do we safely fish?
Meet Karina brevis, a dinoflagellate alga that has moved into our beaches.  It is a single cell organism which produces neurotoxins.  The two flagella allow it to move through water.  It requires light to grow and reproduce and is usually in surface water.  In high concentrations the water takes on a reddish or pinkish color – giving it the name red tide.
These organisms have been described as early as the 15th century by Spanish explorers.  Southwest Florida is especially noted for these algal blooms which are increasing in frequency.  They also occur around Texas and Mexican coastal waters.  They are a part of the natural community of marine organisms and recent frequent and intensive blooms raise speculation that human activities generate excessive nutrients in runoff waters resulting in bloom conditions.  The neurotoxins have deleterious effects on fish, marine mammals, turtles, birds and shellfish.  These toxins are airborne and have respiratory effects in humans.  Common symptoms include difficulty breathing, coughing, and shortness of breath.  It has also depresses the immune system.  There is also a red tide on the western coast of our country.
Our west coast Florida red tide is different than the west coast from mid California to Washington and even extending into Alaska.  The algal organism there is Pseudo-nitzschia.  It also produces a neurotoxin, domoic acid.  It requires very high concentrations of the organism to cause harm.
Well so much for the villain.  Where do we fish when Karina is wreaking havoc? 
THE BACK COUNTRY!

Head for the back country of rivers and bays away from gulf waters.  Check out the water and made sure there are no dead fish along the bank or pilings.  Get out that fly rod and drift along the bank and get that fly in, under, and around structures.  Common places to throw that fly include trees, logs, bushes, mangroves, docks, bridges and pilings.  A horizontal cast will get the fly under docks and the branches of shore vegetation.  Get your cast as close as possible to the bank and explore undercut areas.  Bendbacks, Clouser minnows and poppers can be the go to flies.  Vary your retrieve between long slow strips to sharp tugs for surface flies.  Once you get a few strikes work the area especially if snook are around.  On a recent trip we caught several snook and Pat landed a 27 incher.  Nice catch!


Tom Gadacz & Captain Pat Damico, IFFF MCI

Pat Damico w/ very nice snook




Tom Gadacz w/20" Snook




2016 NW Fly Fishing & Fly Tying Expo


The Northwest Fly Fishing and Fly Tying Expo is an annual event put on by the Oregon Council of the International Federation of Fly Fishers.  The 2016 Expo will be held March 11th and 12th at the Linn County Fair Grounds in Albany, Oregon.  The doors open each morning at 9:00am.  This is an event you will want to put on the calendar now. 

The main attraction is over 200 demonstration tyers that rotate every 2 ½ hours over the two days.  There are 70 tyers tying at individual tables with chairs provided to sit and watch the tyer.  All of the fly genres are covered including nymphs, dry, steelhead, classic salmon, streamers, and realistic flies.  If you are not sure who to watch, the best thing to do is to walk around the tyer tables and find an open seat.  Even if you are not interested in a specific type of fly, a lot can be learned by sitting down and watching a tyer demonstrate different techniques.  Tyers will have tips on material selection, tying tips, and sometimes fishing tips for the patterns.  They are also able to answer questions during the demonstration.  It is one of the best ways to learn and improve tying skills.

Classes are offered each day for fly tying, casting, and fly fishing.  Classes are limited in size, so it is a great opportunity to learn in a classroom environment.  There are some casting classes that are 1 on 1, which provide excellent opportunities to work on specific casting problems.  There are casting classes that cover both single and double handed casting.  The fly fishing classes will help prepare you to go to a specific location.  You can sign-up for classes on the Expo website – http://nwexpo.com, staring in January 2016.  The classes change each year, so make sure you check out what is being offered this year. 

Over 50 exhibitors attend the expo and offer great deals on everything from fly tying materials, fly rods and reels, fly fishing art, and boats.  The Expo presents an opportunity to see a wide variety of items in once place.   Exhibitors often offer special show discounts and will also have new items available for purchase.  There are many art items that are one of a kind and make special gifts. 

Throughout both days there are silent auctions and raffles.  Exhibitors and participants make wonderful donations that are used for these purposes.  The event concludes with a live auction and banquet Saturday evening.  The live auction offers one of a kind framed flies along fly rods and other special items.  During the banquet two college students that are majoring in fishery management are awarded scholarships.  The students give a short talk one what they are studying and it provides a look-in to the research that is being done on fisherman’s behalf. 

The Expo is put on by the Oregon Council to provide education to the general public on fly fishing and fly tying.  The revenues generated by the Expo are also used by the Oregon Council to provide educational programs on fly tying, casting, and fishing throughout the state of Oregon.  The Council also supports conservation projects with the proceeds. 


We hope to see you at the Expo in 2016!